“Is there anything wrong with being 53 and pregnant?” That is the question posed by New York Magazine this Fall. Well, in the new age of reproductive technology, many women chose to focus on establishing a career or finding the right partner before starting a family, and people are becoming parents later in life. Although many would say you do not need to see statistics to know that the age for first time parents is increasing—just look at your neighborhood park—New York Magazine shares some significant numbers. Particularly interesting, “In 2008, the most recent year for which detailed data are available, about 8,000 babies were born to women 45 or older, more than double the number in 1997, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Five hundred and forty-one of these were born to women age 50 or older—a 375 percent increase.” A 365% increase…wow!

Some people have a certain knee-jerk negative reaction to hearing about older women starting families. What do you think? While older parents, and their children, can worry about the future…“Will mom be at my 30th birthday party?” There are certainly advantages that cannot be overlooked. Feeling a sense of maturity and readiness and having a more stable financial situation, for starters. Plus, increased job security allows many older parents to take more time off work. And, as New York Magazine points out, having a baby after 50 very rarely happens by accident—these babies are worked for and very much wanted. This is seen through the profiles of older parents in the article. As one older mother states at the end of the article, “And every now and then I just burst out crying. I am so happy. I can’t believe it. I’m just so blessed. And I just wish this on everyone I know.”

 

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